Sex predators on dating websites

"Never in my wildest dreams did I think I was going out with a criminal," said the woman, whose face and voice were disguised for the broadcast interview.ABC reported that charges are pending in the case, and it quoted Wurtzel's attorney as saying that the incident was "a consensual sexual encounter." The class action names as plaintiffs, along with "Jane Doe," all of Match.com's paying female members from August 2010 to the present.Constitutionally speaking, where can the line be drawn?

These are just a few of the both real world and imagined scenarios that have inspired attempts in recent weeks to restrict registered sex offenders from social networking, virtual gaming and online dating.

Similarly, the online dating sites are only screening out sex offenders who provide identifying information that matches what is on the registry.

A major concern, in terms of both effectiveness and fairness, is how some of these approaches inelegantly lump together all kinds of sex offenders.

The day before, a Louisiana bill forbidding registered sex offenders from using social networking sites was approved by a state House committee.

(A similar bill was signed into law in Illinois in 2009 and put on hold in California in 2011.) Late last month, Match.com, e Harmony and the Spark Networks signed a "joint statement of business principles" to attempt to screen out registered sex offenders.